Current P2R Mentors


    Alfredo Reyes

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    (Program Coordinator, Ph.D. Student, Education)

    Having the opportunity to lead P2R has been among my most rewarding opportunities and has profoundly shaped my studies. In the years ahead my dissertation will use Indigenous and decolonial studies as well as concepts from quantum physics to ask questions about how under/graduate researchers create policy related to immigrant justice through their experience with citizenship and research. Through a unique partnership of three mentoring programs; including, the Center for Labor Studies (CLS), Community-Based Action Research and Advocacy (CARA), and Pathways to Research (P2R), my study looks at how local government and social-service providers can collaborate to produce better public-policy where immigrants are not solely given sanctuary but engaged in shaping policy agendas.


    This has several interconnected goals with pedagogical and practical implications for UCSC: 1) to question basic assumptions about the production of knowledge and power by gaining an understanding of the historical and colonial formation of citizenship (defined as simultaneous inclusion / exclusion across histories, institutions, societies, cultures, economies, etc.) as lived by first-generation under/graduate students; 2) to train and mentor a team of 10 interdisciplinary and intercultural under/graduate researchers in the social sciences - as a cohort and as leaders in a three-year Community-engaged research project in Santa Cruz county; 3) to address the needs of immigrant communities in our county by helping articulate a county-wide action agenda for immigrant justice through a decolonial approach to policy design and implementation; and 4) to elevate the voices and knowledges of marginalized communities and shift immigration narratives: neither illegal nor undocumented - but in(di)visibly human.


    In my free time you can find me trail-running throughout upper-campus, working on random art projects, and looking for reasons to celebrate with friends the small victories of being a Ph.D. student.


  • Andrew Takimoto

  • Andrew Takimoto

    (Mentor, Ph.D. Student, Psychology)

    My name is Andrew Takimoto and I am a 2nd year PhD student in the Developmental Psychology program. Much of my research looks at social relationships and emotional developments during the transition from adolescent to adulthood, particularly for Latinx students during college. I am a first-generation college student from Los Angeles who completed their undergrad and MA at CSU, Northridge. In my free time, I like to go to music shows and cultural events with my friends, play video games, travel and explore big urban cities, and listen to new music.


  • Debbie Duarte

  • Debbie Duarte

    (Mentor, Ph.D. Student, Literature)

    My name is Debbie Duarte. I am originally from Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up, the majority of my life, in Southern California. My experiences growing up as an immigrant in the United States led me to develop a passion for education that is centered around promoting justice and liberation through the creation of knowledge practices that are critical of the power relationships within the university. In other words, I am interested in thinking about the ways in which the University can become an accomplice to oppression but also the ways in which practices of knowledge that combat oppression can also flourish within the university. I navigate this contradiction using a variety of methods and interdisciplinary work. My undergraduate career in Latin American Latino Studies, which I completed at UC Santa Cruz, helped me think about ways to conduct social science research utilizing methods and theoretical frameworks that were critical of the ways in which the university objectifies or oppresses certain communities and takes from them their ability to produce knowledge. As a graduate student in my 1st year of a PhD program in the Literature department at UCSC, I seek to utilize primary sources and literature from several eras to continue this work and to think about how we can bridge social science research with the lived experiences of the communities we seek to support and empower. As a result, I am very interested in concepts such as decolonization, settler-colonialism, citizenship, and coloniality. In my free time, I can often be found scouring the library and checking out more books than I can carry, spontaneously writing short stories in a downtown coffee shop, or searching the city for trees with ripe fruit to eat on sunny days.


  • Dennis Browe

  • Dennis Browe

    (Mentor, Ph.D. Student, Sociology)

    I am a second-year Sociology Ph.D. student, living and learning in our beautiful (and unaffordable) town situated squarely between the ocean and redwood forest. I hold a BA in Philosophy and a minor in Cultural Anthropology from SUNY Binghamton, as well as an MA in Sexuality Studies from San Francisco State University. My original academic passion is gender and sexuality studies and my other interests include public health and urban health inequities, medical sociology, and science & technology studies. My research focuses on understanding ongoing changes in healthcare and public health. I currently work on a research project investigating the rise of Precision Medicine at UCSF Mission Bay, a biomedicine initiative located at the intersection of three (increasingly overlapping) domains: academic medical research and healthcare, biotech and pharma industries, and governmental policies favorable to development.

     

    I lived in San Francisco for a decade before coming to Santa Cruz, during which time I worked a few jobs at SF State relevant to my studies here. I first worked on a large-scale, public health HIV/AIDS project involving a network of agencies whose goal it was to link HIV+ individuals into medical care. I then spent three years as the Graduate Administrative Coordinator for a Philosophy MA program which taught me some of the intricacies of navigating academia. Especially relevant was learning the ways in which universities, by virtue of their bureaucratic and knowledge-making structures, tend to perpetuate the status quo. As a staff, I worked with numerous first-generation students facing unique hurdles to making their way through both undergraduate and graduate humanities programs. The best part of my job was witnessing students persevere and succeed, especially by building friendships and supporting each other through the programs. I now look forward and am honored to serve as a P2R mentor!


  • Sona Kaur

  • Sona Kaur

    (Mentor, Ph.D. Candidate, Social Psychology)

    My name is Sona Kaur and I am a 6th year graduate student studying Social Psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. I was born in India, and have since lived in Texas, New York, and before moving to Santa Cruz, called Virginia home.


    I study the relationship between gender, power, and sex and how individuals are socialized regarding these topics through various media. I also study different forms of violence against women, rape culture, and the sexualization and objectification of women. My research examines these lines of research in both the Western and South Asian context. Specifically, I explore how Indian values (e.g., shame, honor) and traditional cultural practices (e.g., arranged marriages) may be implicated in violence against South Asian women. Currently I am working on my dissertation project, which aims to examine how different forms of relationship abuse becomes romanticized amongst women.


    I am passionate about mentoring students and supporting them in research and the graduate school application process. I look forward to being a member of the Pathways to Research team for the 2018-2019 school year!


  • Theresa Hice Johnson

  • Theresa Hice Johnson

    (Mentor, Ph.D. Student, Sociology)

    My name is Theresa and I moved to Santa Cruz in 2017 from Central Pennsylvania where I completed by B.A. in Political Science and Spanish with a minor in International Relations. I am a second-year PhD student in the Sociology department, working on designated emphases in Feminist Studies and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES). This is my first year working with Pathways2Research and I am very excited to work closely with undergraduates interested in social science research!


    Currently, I am working on my master's thesis which analyzes the organizational efforts and program effects of a non-profit organization based out of Oakland. In 2018, the organization facilitated the mentorship of 8 high school girls of color from the Greater San Francisco Bay Area and took them to Dubai, United Arab Emirates and Johannesburg and Durban, South Africa. My dissertation project will look at this and similar organizations in Oakland and Baltimore, MD and the effect of international travel on youth racial identity formation. My research interests include Black youth, racial identity formation, African Diaspora, education, community organizations, Black feminism, post colonialism, and decolonialism. I am a member of the Santa Cruz Chapter of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and at UCSC, I am a TA in the Sociology department; a co-founder of the Feminist Collective of Sisters in the Borderlands (affiliated with the Research Center of the Americas); and a 2018-19 Graduate Student Ambassador of Planetary Health (through the UC Global Health Initiative). When I am not knee-deep in reading for school, I am at the beach, traveling over the hill to find yummy restaurants, volunteering in my daughter's Kindergarten class, or trying to keep up with all of the great shows on Netflix! 


  • Victoria Sanchez

  • Victoria Sanchez

    (Lead mentor, Ph.D. Candidate, Latin American and Latinx Studies)

    My name is Victoria Sanchez and I am a fourth year PhD candidate in the Latin American and Latinx Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. I was born in El Paso, TX but grew up in Chicago, IL. I received my B.A. in Gender Studies with a concentration in Latin American Studies from Carleton College. This is my third year working with the Pathways to Research Program and I am excited to be back! I locate my research at the nexus of migration and border studies, feminist science and technology studies, and critical race and ethnic studies. My current dissertation examines the contemporary visual politics of migrant surveillance at and beyond the U.S./Mexico border. Informed by the theoretical insights from visual studies, women of color feminisms, decolonial theory and border capital, my dissertation seeks to place questions of visuality--of seeing and being (un)seen--at the center of contemporary political debates about migration, surveillance, and security. I have written papers about the ways in which tech capital venture intersect with militarized nationalism to generate new landscapes of security and surveillance. I have also written papers on Latinx and Latin American speculative cultural production and feminist trans-border art and technology collaboratives in the United States, Mexico and Central America. I argue that these sites offer up contestations of surveillance, borders and digital universalist imaginaries. In my free time, I enjoy hiking, yoga, cycling, spending time with family and friends, and binge-watching science fiction films and shows like Battlestar Galactica, Westworld, and Black Mirror.